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INTERVIEW: Georgina Penny, author of Summer Harvest

Monday, May 30, 2016

Interview with GEORGINA PENNEY, author of A Summer Harvest 



 Are you a daydreamer too?
Definitely! If I don’t give myself time to daydream I don’t get any sleep at night. I find my best ideas turn up when I just let my mind wander for a bit. A nice sunbeam and a comfy couch to do said mind wandering are always welcome.

Have you always wanted to be a writer?
According to family legend, I’ve been telling stories since conception so I’ll have to say yes. I just didn’t really know how to get around to it until I found myself an expat wife in Saudi Arabia around ten years ago now.

Tell me a little about yourself – where were you born, where do you live, what do you like to do? 
I was born in Kununurra in the top end of Australia and have lived all over really. I think I counted over 30 house moves in Oz and internationally the last time I sat down and thought about it. I love to travel and meet new people. I think having a good conversation with someone is the peak of human experience and I definitely know how to talk!


How did you get the first flash of inspiration for A Summer Harvest?
I was listening to a friend who was going through a tough time recovering from breast cancer tell me about the fear she faced every day of a relapse and I decided I wanted to get that down on the page.



How extensively do you plan your novels? 
Enough that I have my head around a setting, my lead characters and their main conflicts. Everything else is a sweary, messy fight to wrangle those characters into some sort of plot!

Do you ever use dreams as a source of inspiration?
Absolutely. I’ve been known to launch out of bed on many occasions, muttering to myself over forgetting to leave a notebook out ready. I tend to find my brain uses dreams to let me know about plot holes in the stories I’m writing. I wish it would pick a better method and a more convenient time but there it is☺

Did you make any astonishing serendipitous discoveries while writing this book?
I love writing characters of all ages, especially in families. I think that’s the discovery. I loved writing the secondary characters and especially Rob Hardy and Gwen Stone, they were an absolute joy to get on the page.

Where do you write, and when?
I try and work to a 9-5 schedule but when I say that, I’m kind of lying. What usually happens is that I sit down in the morning, intending on getting everything down and then my imagination decides to go on strike until around 3 in the afternoon when I’m left frantically trying to get all the ideas down before they escape. I’ve tried sitting down at 3 to start my day but it doesn’t work. It seems I need the run up!

What is your favourite part of writing?
Getting the ideas initially and then the editing afterwards. Essentially everything but the actual writing of the first draft!
 
What do you do when you get blocked? 
I go for a walk or better yet, have a conversation with someone. I’m a talker and the minute I start chatting with someone, I tend to find interesting solutions to whatever problem I’m having on the page.

How do you keep your well of inspiration full?
I shut out all the white noise. I find being online too much or watching too much mindless TV numbs me out. Instead I try and listen to good music, watch good movies and read good books. Oh, and I travel a lot! Even when it’s to the next village here in Scotland as opposed to somewhere international, I always find something new to experience and think about.

Do you have any rituals that help you to write? 

Definitely. I’m a fruit cake with that kind of thing. I have to have a cup of tea next to me when I start my day and it has to be in my ‘writing’ cup if I’m writing or in my ‘editing’ cup if I’m editing. I’m also been known to talk to myself to nut out problems and I may sing far too loudly to music when I’ve got my headphones in. There’s a whole raft more of battier things that may involve taking whiteboard markers into the shower to scribble on the tiles when I’m really stuck on a problem but then it gets a little weird… ;)

Who are ten of your favourite writers?
This kind of question is always so hard because depending on my mood and the day, the list changes. So, how about I go for the first ten authors I have on the top shelf of my’ comfort read’ bookcase?
Terry Pratchett, Zadie Smith, Amanda Quick, Susan Elizabeth Phillips, PG Wodehouse, Rohinton Mistry, Haruki Murakami, Val McDermid, Elmore Leonard, Junot Diaz



What do you consider to be good writing?  
Anything that fires the imagination and transports the reader. While I truly appreciate beautifully written prose, my first port of call for a good book is whether or not it triggers my emotions and takes me on a journey. 

What is your advice for someone dreaming of being a writer too?
Want it badly, be brave and do it. It’s a messy, random, wonderful, sometimes exasperating process and if you want it badly enough, you’ll get there. Oh, and know that your best opportunities will come from kindness to others☺

What are you working on now? 
 Too many things! I’m beginning to suspect that I’m a workaholic. At the moment I’m pottering away on my next Aussie set book, the first in a steampunk series and the second in a US based contemporary series. I’ve worked out that the way to keep myself from going nuts worrying about sales, fate and whether or not the universe is going to smile on any given day is to keep on truckin’ ☺

Love interviews with writers? I have lots more!
 


BOOK REVIEW: SUMMER HARVEST by Georgina Penney

Sunday, May 29, 2016


THE BLURB:

 English dog trainer Beth Poole is having trouble getting her life back together after beating a life-threatening illness and divorcing her husband. When her Aussie-soap-obsessed grandma sends her to Australia to recover, it seems a great opportunity for some rest and relaxation while she figures out what's next.

But when Beth arrives in Australia things get off to a rocky start. To begin with, she's on the wrong coast and there are deadly creatures everywhere.

And if that weren't enough, her neighbours are driving her crazy. She's staying in the beautiful Margaret River wine region, right next door to a family-owned vineyard. 

It should be perfect, but the boisterous Hardy clan just don't seem able to leave her alone. 

The usually reserved Beth is soon reluctantly embroiled in their family disputes and romantic entanglements. And eldest son Clayton Hardy is proving surprisingly persistent.

The more Beth gets to know Clayton and the Hardy's, the more she sees what she wants for her future. But as the end of summer approaches, her past comes back to haunt her and will test her new found relationships to the limit.

From the author of Fly In Fly Out comes this entertaining and touching story about family, friendship and love among the grapevines.

WHAT I THOUGHT OF THIS BOOK:

A funny, romantic story with lots of heart, set in the Margaret River wine region and featuring engaging characters and light-hearted encounters. Beth Poole is a Yorkshire lass who has had a rough time. 

Her Aussie-soap-loving grandmother gives her a ticket to Australia as a birthday present.

Beth is terrified of snakes and spiders and sharks, and in fact, nearly everything. And her heart has been badly bruised in the past. 

However, the warm-hearted Hardy clan, who own the vineyard on which Beth stays, soon have her embroiled in all sorts of complications. 

My only reservation about this engaging book is that about halfway through I began to realise that it was a follow-on from an earlier book by Georgina Penny called Fly In, Fly Out.

I usually like to read books in order, and so I’d have liked to have done so here. However, the books clearly stand alone, and I look forward to picking up Fly In, Fly Out now that I’ve been charmed by the Hardy clan. 

WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THIS BOOK?


INTERVIEW: Christine Wells, author of A Wife's Tale

Friday, May 27, 2016

Interview with CHRISTINE WELLS, author of "The Wife's Tale"



Are you a daydreamer too?
Oh, most definitely! I think you have to be as a fiction writer. Stories are always running through my mind. I must be difficult to live with when I’m working intensively on a first draft because I have the story in my head constantly and don’t hear people when they speak to me. 

Have you always wanted to be a writer?
No, I thought novelists were god-like creatures when I was a child. While I loved writing stories, I never thought having writing as a job was possible for someone as ordinary and uninteresting as I was. I wanted to be a brain surgeon until I worked out that I wasn’t great with blood. I loved the humanities and eventually gravitated toward the law. There’s a lot of reading and writing involved in a law degree and I enjoyed the commercial aspect of negotiating deals and all the excitement of settling a big transaction. It wasn’t until I had spent a few years as a lawyer that I wrote my first novel but very soon, writing fiction became an obsession. It was something I needed to do.

Tell me a little about yourself – where were you born, where do you live, what do you like to do? 
I was born, raised, and now live in Brisbane. I love traveling, mainly to England (for research, of course!) spending time with family and friends, baking and going to the beach. I love antiques, too, for the stories people tell about them as much as for their beauty. I’m a huge fan of The Antiques Roadshow. I’m also trying to get back into running because I love it, but it’s been a while. I’m working on it!

How did you get the first flash of inspiration for THE WIFE'S TALE?
I was having lunch with my editor, discussing a new direction, and the kernel of an idea for a story that dealt with a historical court case came to me. I’d always been interested in legal history, having done some very obscure research for one of my lecturers at university. I found the feminist legal theory I’d read when studying legal philosophy fascinating also. 



I decided to write about a woman caught up in a criminal conversation action, which is an old cause of action in which the husband sues his wife’s lover, basically for damage to his ‘chattel’, the wife. These cases became quite a spectator sport in the latter half of eighteenth century England and the equivalent of millions of dollars in today’s money was often awarded to the husband in damages. The wife’s character and sexual proclivities were openly debated in court and she was not allowed to testify or be represented because the action was between the husband and the lover. Both sides would present their stories and the wife never got to tell hers, even though she was the one who might well end up cast off and destitute when the trial was over. THE WIFE’S TALE is about giving the wife in one of these cases a voice of her own.


How extensively do you plan your novels? 
My process has evolved considerably over the years. I used to write with only a vague idea of how the story would go but now I use Scrivener to plot extensively. The plot is never set in stone and sometimes new threads emerge as the characters develop in unexpected ways, but usually I stay fairly true to my original plan.


Do you ever use dreams as a source of inspiration? 
No—sadly, the only dreams I remember these days are the ones where I am looking for something quite mundane that I need desperately and I can never find it—last time it was the coffee plunger! I certainly use daydreams, though, and I believe firmly in the subconscious working on the story while you sleep.


Did you make any astonishing serendipitous discoveries while writing this book?
Oh, yes, there were several—perhaps not astonishing but serendipitous, at least! Because the Gothic novel grew up around the time I was writing and I wanted to give my heroine some believable means of supporting herself, I decided to make her a novelist. It then transpired that an early nineteenth century novelist, Caroline Norton, had actually been through a criminal conversation trial. Her struggles inspired me as I wrote Delany. 

The other incident was when I wrote a fictional tapas bar into the present-day town of Ventnor on the Isle of Wight and brought the chef from the tapas bar to cook paella at a garden festival on Seagrove, my fictional estate. I had based the Seagrove gardens on the Botanic Gardens at Ventnor, which have separate sections featuring plants from several subtropical regions. If you’ve ever been to Ventnor, you will know that it is a small, Victorian seaside town, where you would not expect to find something so exotic as a tapas bar, but I decided that I was Supreme Being in this story and I could make up a tapas bar if I wanted to. When I went to the Isle of Wight after writing the first draft, I found that in fact there is a tapas bar in Ventnor, called Il Toro Contento. Not only that, but on the restaurant wall is a newspaper clipping of the chef cooking paella at the Botanic Gardens. I wrote all of that before I ever set foot on the Isle of Wight, so it’s amazing how serendipitous writing can be!


Where do you write, and when?
When I’m on deadline, I write in two places—in my study at home from 4am to 6am each morning and then later at a cafe, after I’ve dropped the boys off at school. I find if I’m not home during the day, I am less often disturbed, either by thoughts of domestic chores that need to be done or by the phone or people coming to the door. 


What is your favourite part of writing?
When I’m in what I call ‘the zone’ and the words are flowing freely. I love that feeling when you don’t even notice the hours flying by. There’s nothing like it.


What do you do when you get blocked? 
I’ve never suffered from true writer’s block, thank goodness, but there are times when it’s very hard to make myself write. When this happens, I sit there at the same place at the same time, day after day, not letting myself do anything else, until I start writing again. After a few days of this, I find the words start flowing. Another trick is to try to analyse the story so far and see if there’s something in the structure that is not working, although that analysis often convinces me that I should throw it all out and start again! For me, the best way to avoid blockage in the first place is to get up from the computer before I've written to the end of a scene or chapter. It’s easier to begin again when you return and see that unfinished train of thought than it is to write into the unknown every day.


How do you keep your well of inspiration full?
I read a lot of research books before and while I’m writing a novel. I watch movies set in the same era or with the sort of feeling I’m trying to evoke. I watch The Antique Roads Show and read wonderful novels and listen to workshops on writing craft. I love going to art and museum exhibitions although I don’t go often enough. I also love to bake and I find that very relaxing, if not too kind to the waistline!

Do you have any rituals that help you to write? 
My best practice is to have a clean desk and no mess in my line of sight. I get up, make a cup of coffee, go straight to the computer in my study and write with the curtains drawn and the door shut. 

Who are ten of your favourite writers?
(I am deliberately choosing writers I don’t know personally here!) Jane Austen, Georgette Heyer, Liane Moriarty, Ian McEwan, Lisa Gardner, Katherine Webb, Kate Morton, Elizabeth Peters, John Le Carre, Jojo Moyes



What do you consider to be good writing?  
Good writing, to me, is first and foremost about creating characters with that spark that makes them come to life and go on to live in the reader's mind even when she's not reading. The most beautiful prose in the world does not make up for flat characters. However, I appreciate careful word choice, an author who can encapsulate an idea in an original, perfect simile or metaphor, as well as those authors who have a knack of putting into words the things we think but never say. 

What is your advice for someone dreaming of being a writer too? 
I am laughing at myself, giving writing advice but here is the best I have heard and am happy to pass on--Institute a writing practice so that it becomes a habit, like brushing your teeth and make it your job for those one or two hours, whatever you can spare, every day you can. This will stand you in good stead when you sell a book and have to write under pressure. And don’t worry about how good the first draft is. I once heard someone say, “You’re not a brain surgeon. You don’t have to get it right the first time." I think that is excellent advice.

What are you working on now? 
I’m working on a dual timeline novel set partly in the 1990s and partly in World War II in England. It’s about a young Australian woman whose long lost grandmother invites her to stay at her Elizabethan house in the Cotswolds, but when she gets there, the grandmother has vanished. It’s tentatively called THE SECRET HOUSE and is slated for release in May 2017.

Love interviews with authors - I have plenty more!

PLEASE LEAVE A COMMENT - I LOVE TO KNOW WHAT YOU THINK!

BOOK REVIEW: The Wife's Tale by Christine Wells

Wednesday, May 25, 2016




The Wife’s Tale  - Christine Wells 


The Wife’s Tale is a dual timeline novel that alternates between the point-of-view of Liz Jones, a young Australian lawyer whose ambition and drive to succeed have put her marriage at risk, and Delany Nash, who was at the centre of an infamous scandal in the 1780s.  Most of the action is centred on Seagrove, a grand old house on the Isle of Wight, as Liz becomes fascinated with Delany’s story and begins to dig deeper. However, the secrets she uncovers puts at risk her newfound relationship with the owners of Seagrove, and indeed her own future.  Anyone who knows me knows that I love a dual timeline novel, yet they can be difficult to write. Often one storyline works and the other doesn’t, or there’s a slippage between the two distinct voices that jars. Christine Wells has pulled it off brilliantly. Both story lines are intriguing, and the suspense builds steadily. The two women are very different, yet both have hidden strengths that make them very appealing. And I loved the romance!

I was given an advance copy of The Wife’s Tale to read, in case I liked it enough to give it an endorsement. And I did! So the cover has my thoughts on it: ‘A captivating story of love, secrets and obsession – I enjoyed every word!’ 

PLEASE LEAVE A COMMENT - I LOVE TO KNOW WHAT YOU THINK!

I have lots of other reviews of parallel narratives, if you love them too - check them out here!



BOOK REVIEW: WILD WOOD by Posie Graeme-Evans

Wednesday, March 02, 2016



THE BLURB:

For fans of Diana Galbaldon’s Outlander series comes a gripping and passionate new historical novel. Intrigue, ancient secrets, fairy tales, and the glorious scenery of the Scottish borders drive the story of a woman who must find out who she really is.


Jesse Marley calls herself a realist; she’s all about the here and now. But in the month before Charles and Diana’s wedding in 1981 all her certainties are blown aside by events she cannot control. 

First she finds out she’s adopted. Then she’s run down by a motor bike. In a London hospital, unable to speak, she must use her left hand to write. But Jesse’s right-handed. And as if her fingers have a will of their own, she begins to draw places she’s never been, people from another time—a castle, a man in armor. And a woman’s face.

Rory Brandon, Jesse’s neurologist, is intrigued. Maybe his patient’s head trauma has brought out latent abilities. But wait. He knows the castle. He’s been there.

So begins an extraordinary journey across borders and beyond time, a chase that takes Jesse to Hundredfield, a Scottish stronghold built a thousand years ago by a brutal Norman warlord. What’s more, Jesse Marley holds the key to the castle’s secret and its sacred history. 

And Hundredfield, with its grim Keep, will help Jesse find her true lineage. But what does the legend of the Lady of the Forest have to do with her? That’s the question at the heart of Wild Wood. There are no accidents. There is only fate.

WHAT I THOUGHT OF THIS BOOK: 

WILD WOOD is a dual timeline narrative that moves between the Scottish Borderlands in the 14th century and an unhappy young woman in the 1980s who finds herself compelled to draw the same Scottish castle over and over again.

I love stories with parallel timelines, particularly with a good dash of romance, history and magic added in, and I love books set in Scotland, so all the ingredients were in place for a really wonderful read.

I must admit I loved the scenes set in the past more – the story of the mute fairy wife, the battle-hardened warrior and the medieval castle were all so intriguing.

The contemporary scenes did not work quite so well for me, perhaps because the 1980s is not a decade that really inspires me. 

However, the story of Jesse and her eerie connection with the past eventually drew me in, and the story really began to gallop along.

I LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS:

REVIEW: SMALL ACTS OF DISAPPEARANCE: Essays on Hunger by Fiona Wright

Tuesday, January 05, 2016

THE BLURB:

Small Acts of Disappearance is a collection of ten essays that describes the author’s affliction with an eating disorder which begins in high school, and escalates into life-threatening anorexia over the next ten years.

Fiona Wright is a highly regarded poet and critic, and her account of her illness is informed by a keen sense of its contradictions and deceptions, and by an awareness of the empowering effects of hunger, which is unsparing in its consideration of the author’s own actions and motivations. 

The essays offer perspectives on the eating disorder at different stages in Wright’s life, at university, where she finds herself in a radically different social world to the one she grew up in, in Sri Lanka as a fledgling journalist, in Germany as a young writer, in her hospital treatments back in Sydney.

They combine research, travel writing, memoir, and literary discussions of how writers like Christina Stead, Carmel Bird, Tim Winton, John Berryman and Louise Glück deal with anorexia and addiction; together with accounts of family life, and detailed and humorous views of hunger-induced situations of the kind that are so compelling in Wright’s poetry.

MY THOUGHTS ON THIS BOOK:

SMALL ACTS OF DISAPPEARANCE is a series of interlinked essays inspired by the author’s struggle with an eating disorder. Fiona Wright is an award-winning poet currently undertaking a doctorate in writing at University of Western Sydney. 

Each essay on its own is superbly crafted and exquisitely written. Some are deeply personal and gut-wrenchingly emotional, while others take her obsession with not eating as a springboard to explore other territories, such as issues of anorexia in Australian literature.  Together they create an utterly extraordinary collection – intelligent, fierce and deeply informative. 

I WOULD LOVE TO GET YOUR FEEDBACK ON THIS COLLECTION OF ESSAYS 


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