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SPOTLIGHT: Best Books on Jews in Nazi Germany

Sunday, September 20, 2015

My novel THE BEAST'S GARDEN is a retelling of the Grimm brothers' version of 'Beauty & the Beast' set in Nazi Germany. 

The story takes place between Kristallnacht in November 1938, and the fall of Berlin in April 1948, with most of the action centred on Berlin, the nerve centre of the Third Reich. 


I did an enormous amount of research while writing THE BEAST'S GARDEN, and I have had numerous letters and messages asking me about how I went about my research and what books were most useful for me. 

 So I've decided to do a series of blog posts about my research books, in the hope it will help those interested in reading more deeply.


To begin with, I thought I'd share the books which best helped me understand the plight of Jewish people in Berlin during those terrible years. 


JEWS IN NAZI BERLIN: From Kristallnacht To Liberation - edited by Beate Meyer, Hermann Simon and Chana Schitz

This book is a collection of scholarly essays and articles by a variety of scholars, covering every aspect of Jewish life from the Juni-Aktion in Berlin in 1938, to the 'Snatchers' (the Gestapo's Jewish informants who betrayed many Jews hiding in the capital). It is beautifully constructed and illustrated, and contains many first-hand and personal accounts which really rammed home the horror of the times.   My copy is now looking very battered, as it was on or beside my desk for months. 


BETWEEN DIGNITY & DESPAIR: Jewish Life in Nazi Germany -  Marion A. Kaplan

My copy of this book has been marked on nearly every page - it was an absolutely essential guide for me. It draws on a variety of memoirs, diaries, letters, and official reports to explore what life was like for the Jews in the Third Reich. I particularly loved the emphasis it gave to the live of Jewish women as they struggled to feed and protect their families. 


HITLER'S WILLING EXECUTIONERS: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust - Daniel Jonah Goldhagen

This is one of the most chilling books I have ever read. I found it very hard to read, and only managed by studying one chapter at a time, with long breaks in between. It shows, with surgical precision, just how deeply engrained anti-semitism was in everyday German life and how that led to the Holocaust. Utterly heart-breaking and powerful, it draws upon a multitude of first-hand accounts and documents, many of them ever before examined. 


HITLER'S FURIES: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields  - Wendy Lower

In HITLER'S FURIES, Wendy Lower looks closely at the lives of thirteen ordinary German women who became renowned for their cruelty and barbarism in the killing fields of Eastern Europe.  Some were nurses, some were secretaries, some were wives of Nazi officers - yet they all acted with utter cold-heartedness and, in some cases, sociopathic sadism. Another harrowing read. 


THE BEASTS OF BUCHENWALD - Flint Whitlock

BUCHENWALD: HELL ON A HILLTOP - Flint Whitlock

Buchenwald is one of the most infamous German concentration camp, and is the setting for a few scenes in my novel THE BEAST'S GARDEN. These two books were of inestimable value in helping me understand what life was like for those poor prisoners locked

 inside its concrete walls. 'The Beasts of Buchenwald' were, of course, Karl and Ilse Koch, most famous for allegedly making lampshades out of human skin.  

  


In the upcoming weeks, I will blog about the best memoirs I read of life under Hitler, best books about the German resistance, and best books on Hitler himself. Keep an eye out!  


PLEASE LEAVE A COMMENT - I LOVE TO KNOW WHAT YOU THINK!

BOOK LIST: Books I Read in November 2013

Sunday, December 15, 2013

Books Read in November 2013

I read 9 books this month, with an interesting mixture of historical fiction, contemporary suspense, and philosophy. It was also AusReading Month in the blogosphere and so I made an effort to read some of the books by Australian authors in my tottering pile of books to-be-read. I managed four – Kelly Gardiner, Sara Foster, Jenny Bond and Damon Young – and I can recommend them all. Proof that we have an exciting degree of writing talent here in Australia!


1. Mrs Poe – Lynn Cullen
I have always thought of Edgar Allen Poe as being a strange, moody, melancholy drunk, prone to irrational rages, with a mind like a dark cabinet of curiosities. This novel bursts open those misconceptions and shines a bright light on his life, through the eyes of the woman who loved him. But no, not his wife. Mrs Poe is told through the eyes of his lover, the poet Frances Osgood. It is mostly set in 1845, the year Poe wrote his most famous poem, ‘The Raven’. There is a Mrs Poe – Edgar’s wife was his first cousin and they were married when she was only 13 – and Frances finds herself torn by love for Edgar and guilt over hurting his naïve and childlike wife. This novel is a really fascinating read – it brought the world of 1840s New York vividly to life, taught me a whole lot I didn’t know, and made me want to go and read Poe again. 

2. The Girl on the Golden Coin – Marci Jefferson
The Restoration is one of my absolute favourite periods of history and I have read a lot of books set in that period. However, I had never read about Frances Stuart before and so I found this novel of her life by Marci Jefferson utterly fascinating. Frances is a distant cousin of Charles II whose family lost everything in the English Civil War and their subsequent exile with the royal court.  Frances has only her beauty and her wit to help her survive in the decadent Restoration court, but she uses both to high advantage. Spying for the French king, Louis XIV, on the one hand and keeping a sensual King Charles II on a short leash with the other hand, Frances must keep a clear head without losing her heart –which proves far more difficult than she imagined.  A wonderful read for anyone who loves historical fiction. 




3. Act of Faith – Kelly Gardiner
Act of Faith is an intoxicating mixture of history, adventure, romance and philosophy. It is, I think, one of the cleverest books to be published for young adults in the past few years, yet it wears its scholarship lightly. The novel is set in 1640. England is in the midst of the English Civil War, a time of extraordinary political and religious upheaval. The heroine of the tale is Isabella Hawkins, daughter of an Oxford don and philosopher. She has been taught by her father to read Greek and Latin, as well as many other languages, but she has to hide her brilliance for, in the mid-17th century educated women were considered quite freakish. When Master Hawkins is imprisoned for his ideas, Isabella helps her father escape but sets in chain a sequence of events that will end in tragedy and exile. She ends up alone, in Amsterdam, working with a printer who is publishing seditious books and smuggling them all over the world. Danger is all around her, but Isabella is determined to work for political liberty and intellectual freedom. With a gorgeous cover and interior design from the Harper Collins designers, this is a book both beautiful and brilliant, and one I highly recommend. 


4. Death & Judgement – Donna Leon
I always enjoy Donna Leon’s murder mysteries set in Venice and featuring the unflappable Commissario Guido Brunetti. This book is No 4 in the series and not one of her best, but its still very readable. In this case, Brunetti is investigating the murder of a prominent lawyer. As he digs deeper, Brunetti discovers a sordid web of corruption, prostitution and lies which ends up hurting his own family. Donna Leon has now written 22 books, and apparently a TV series is being filmed. I’d recommend starting with No 1 (Death at la Fenice) and reading your way through. 


5. Beneath the Shadows – Sara Foster
This contemporary suspense novel begins with a really intriguing premise. Our heroine Grace is living in an old Yorkshire cottage with her husband and newborn baby. One evening, her husband takes the baby out for a walk and never comes back. The baby is found on the doorstep in her pram. One year later, Grace returns to the cottage in an attempt to put the pieces of her life back together. She finds herself troubled by strange happenings and gradually comes to realise that she and her daughter are both in grave danger. The suspense is a little unevenly handled, but the setting is truly creepy and evocative and the story kept me turning the pages. 


6. My Brother Michael – Mary Stewart

Mary Stewart is one of my all-time favourite authors, and I like to re-read at least one of her books again every year. My Brother Michael has never been one of my favourites, but its been a long while since I last read it (at least six years!) so I felt it was time to revisit. I’m so glad I did. Her books are such a joy to read – effortlessly graceful, suspenseful, character-driven and this one made me want to go to Greece so badly. My Brother Michael was first published in 1959, yet it has not dated at all. I wish she had written many many more books!


7. Goodbye, Marianne: A Story of Growing Up in Nazi Germany – Irene N. Watts
A novel for children inspired by the author’s own childhood, this is a beautiful and very moving account of life for a young Jewish girl in Berlin in the early days of World War II. Marianne, like the author, escapes on the Kindertransport to Great Britain, leaving her family behind, so the book does not contain any great atrocity, making it a perfect read for a thoughtful and sensitive child. 


8. Perfect North – Jenny Bond
This historical novel is the first book from Jenny Bond and illuminates a little known expedition to conquer the North Pole by hot-air balloon. Although inspired by true events - the 1897 hydrogen balloon voyage by Swedish explorers S.A Andrée, Knut Frænkel and Nils Strindberg to the North Pole and the discovery of their frozen remains in 1930 – the story is much more focused on the inner life of Strindberg’s fiancée Anna. An intriguing and unusual book.


9. Philosophy in the Garden – Damon Young
What an unusual and engaging book! Damon Young is Honorary Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Melbourne, which makes him sound rather musty and dusty. On the contrary he is young, hip, and has a very readable style. His premise is very simple – he looks at the lives and works of half-a-dozen authors in relation to their garden (or lack of garden) with a particular focus on their philosophies. I was very familiar with some of the writers’ work (Jane Austen, George Orwell, Emily Dickinson), had tried and failed to read some of the others (Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre) and had never heard of one (Nikos Kazantzakis). Each chapter was full of illuminations and insights. I knew Jane Austen loved her garden but did not realise that her writing suffered when she was away from it. I didn’t know Proust kept bonsai by his bed, or that Friedrich Nietzsche lived in a ménage a trois (this was one chapter when I’d have liked to have none a whole lot more!) I loved discovering Emily Dickinson was a gardener and that her poems were full of flower symbology. Each chapter made me want to know more, and sent me on little expeditions of googling and looking up other books. And I’m now off in search of books by Nikos Kazantzakis (he sounds so brilliant, how could I never have heard of him?) I’d really recommend this for anyone with an enquiring mind (even those who, like Sartre, hated gardens). 



How many books did you read last month? Did you beat me? Any good recommendations?

PLEASE LEAVE ME A COMMENT - I LOVE TO KNOW WHAT YOU THINK






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